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    Teks

     

     

     

    TEKS:

    9 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to compare and contrast the stated or implied purposes of different authors writing on the same topic.

    10 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

    (D) synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres.

    23 Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

    (D)  identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and

    (E) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

    Academic Vocabulary:

    connections, synthesize, genre, analyze, inferences, draw conclusions, cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts, evidence, compare and contrast, stated or implied purposes, expository text, logical connections, relevant sources, systematically record, differentiate, paraphrasing, plagiarism, citing valid and reliable sources

     

    Thinking/Speaking Stems:

    • I noticed while reading that the author used ____________ information to back his claim.  (9)

    • When I read this paragraph, I notice the author creates a sense of _____ for the reader by saying_______. (10D)

    • I noticed the the idea __ was also found in this second selection. (10D)

    Sample Assessment Questions:

    • How can the connection of ____________ and ____________ be justified by either the author or text? (9)

    • I noticed after reading _____ that _________ and ___________ gave more insight on the text.  (9)

    • What is the summary of the reading selection? (10)

    • What information best supports the main idea of the reading selection? (10)

    • How are the author’s purposes similar in these two selections? (9)

    • How is the author’s purpose in selection 1 different from the author’s purpose in selection 2? (9)

    • What do the implied purposes of the authors of these two selections have in common? (9)

    • How are the author's’ purposes alike/different in these two selections? (9)

    • What is an idea found in both selections? (10D)

    • What is an idea found in these two different newspaper articles and a stour on this topic? (10D)

    • How are the ideas in these two selections alike/different? (10D)

    Instructional Strategies:

    Resources:

     

     

    TEKS:

    10. Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text

    Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusion https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BxRcfBq-Vv3zZTBJOVQwUy1EUjg&authuser=1usions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to

    1. Summarize the main ideas and supporting details in text, demonstrating an understanding that a summary does not include opinions

    17. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts

    Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to

    1. Create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that:

    1. Present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs

    Academic Vocabulary:

    Expository, analyze, inferences, conclusions, expository texts, evidence, main idea, supporting detail, summary, opinion, procedural, audience, introductions, concluding paragraphs, multi-paragraph

    Thinking/Speaking Stems:

    • I recognize ____ is probably the controlling idea because sentences ___, ___, and ___ all support it.

    • Sentences ___, ___, and ___ make me think the author’s purpose is ______.

    • The author’s thesis is placed ____ because _____.

     

    Sample Assessment Questions:

    • Which of the sentences best expresses the controlling idea/thesis of the selection?

    • The author’s purpose in writing this selection was ________?

    • Which of these details is most important in supporting the author’s controlling idea/thesis?

    Instructional Strategies:

    Resources:


    2nd 9 Weeks

    TEKS:

    1. Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre.

    Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.

    1. infer the implicit theme of a work of fiction, distinguishing theme from the topic;

    2. analyze the function of stylistic elements (e.g., magic helper, rule of three) in traditional and classical literature from various cultures

    6. Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction.

    Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

    1. summarize the elements of plot development (e.g., rising action, turning point, climax, falling action, denouement) in various works of fiction;

    2. recognize dialect and conversational voice and explain how authors use dialect to convey character

    C.  describe different forms of point-of-view, including first- and third-person.



    Academic Vocabulary:

    Analyze, inferences, conclusions, theme, genre, cultural, contemporary, context, implicit, topic, stylistic elements, traditional and classical literature, structure, elements of fiction, evidence, plot development, summarize, point-of-view, first & third person

    Thinking/Speaking Stems:

    • I think the theme is ______, because __________.

    • This author used __________ to emphasize _____________.

    • After reading this story, I could summarize the plot by_______.

    • This story is written from ___ point-of-view, I think if it were written by___ point-of-view the story would change by_____.

    • The author conveys the message of _______ by _______.

    • Based on ___ and ___ I can determine that the central message of the selection is __.

    • I noticed in this short story genre the author’s stylistic element of ____________was different than _____________.

    • I noticed in this short story genre the author’s stylistic element of ____________was different than _____________.

    • I noticed that paragraph/sentence ___ adds to (setting, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement) by showing me __

    • Sentence ______ demonstrates_______ in the story by________.

     

    Sample Assessment Questions:

    • What is one message the author conveys in the story?

    • What is the central message the author presents in this selection?

    • The author uses the stylistic element of the rule of three to show the characters relationship is_______.

    • Paragraph ___ (and ___) contribute to the (Plot element name) of the story by showing _____

    • Which sentence expresses (turning point, climax, rising action, falling action, denouement) in the story?

    • From ____ in paragraph ___, the reader can tell ___

    • What is the best summary of the story/selection?

     

    Instructional Strategies:

    • Use a plot pyramid (attached)  

    • Theme Tree lesson (attached)

    • POV Foldable (attached)

     

    Resources:

     Drama 3rd 9 Weeks 

    TEKS:

    5. Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama.

    Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the similarities and differences in the setting, characters, and plot of a play and those in a film based upon the same story line.

    Academic Vocabulary:

    inferences, conclusions, structure and elements of drama, text evidence, similarities, differences, setting, characters, plot, based, story line

    Thinking/Speaking Stems:

    • I noticed in  Scene ____, the dialogue between ____ and _____ reveals _____

    • The playwright uses the stage directions at the end of Scene ___ to hint that ____

    • Paragraph ____ is important to the play because it shows that ____

    • This play is an outstanding example of dramatic literature because____

    • Based on what happened in Act/Scene ___, I can infer/predict _____

    • I think the author included line ___/this line because _______

    Sample Assessment Questions:

    • What is the most likely purpose of this line?

    • The ___ in Scene ___ is important because it ____

    • Why are the stage directions at the end of Scene ___ important?

    • The language used in ____ helps the reader infer that the ____

    • Describe why this play is an outstanding example of dramatic literature?

    • Which element of dramatic literature is missing from this play?

    • What evidence from this play tells the reader that the play is considered a drama?

    • What is the best summary of the play?

    Instructional Strategies:

    Resources:

    • Scope magazine dramas

    • Prentice Hall Textbook - “The Phantom Tollbooth” by Susan Nanus

    • Youtube video of “The Phantom Tollbooth” play by San Diego Junior Theater
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voUxcVK7T3A

    • Prentice Hall Textbook - “Gluskabe and Old Man Winter” by Joseph Bruchac